Nutrition & Training Adaptions Blog

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Carbohydrate Periodisation Using Sleep Low Strategy

Leading Australian sports nutrition researcher Louis Burke and her colleagues at the Australian Catholic University have recently published a new study showing performance improvements in well conditi...

palatinose vs maltodextrin for cycling performance

Palatinose vs Maltodextrin for Cycling Performance

A new study has challenged the commonly held notion that pre-exercise consumption of a high GI carbohydrate (i.e. maltodextrin) is more beneficial for performance than a lower GI carbohydrate (i.e. Pa...

bradley wiggins drinking out of drink bottle

Best Protein for Exercise

The question of whether protein intake during exercise is beneficial for endurance performance has been a hot topic of debate in recent years. But as new studies have emerged, there is broad acceptanc...

Low Carb High Fat Blog

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Sports nutrition is no longer a matter of just eating to recover or fuel for the next session. Nutrition is now viewed as a factor that can negatively or positively influence the molecular adaptations that occur after a given training session. Eating the wrong food or macronutrient has actually been shown to impair beneficial training that would otherwise occur.

Sleep Low

Athlete trains with low glycogen levels following a high-intensity session and low carb meal the evening prior.

1High-intensity interval session performed in evening/afternoon1
2This session is designed to deplete muscle glycogen2
3Follow HIIT session with low carb meal (<10g), eg eggs & bacon3
4The following morning perform a prolonged low-intensity session4
5This session must be performed in a fasted state (black coffee is fine)5
6Normal high carb meal permitted after fasted session6

"Although the nature of the training stimulus (i.e. intensity and duration) is important in determining how we respond to exercise training, the nutritional status of the muscle before, during and after exercise can be the dominant factor in enhancing or blunting training adaptations and competition performance”

Dr. James Morton

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